Markdown Tables

Table Contents

What I typed

| Row # of Markdown  |  Contents |
|:--- |---|
|  1 |  headers |
| 2  |  alignment |
|  3 |  content |
|  4 |  content |

What you see

Row # of MarkdownContents
1headers
2alignment
3content
4content

Alignment

What I typed

|  row     |  alignment    |  markdown     |
|  :---     |  :-:          |  ---: |
|  1     |  left     |  --:  |
|  2     |  center   |:-:    |
|  3     |  right    |  --:  |

What you see

| row | alignment | markdown |
| :— | :-: | —: |
| 1 | left | –: |
| 2 | center |:-: |
| 3 | right | –: |


Try using the Markdown Tables Generator.

Cabbage Soup

Is your pandemic bulking phase coming to an end?

Now is the time to drop a few thirty pounds for bikini season. For your reading and culinary “pleasure,” here is the infamous cabbage soup recipe from the fad you’ve all heard about, the Cabbage Soup Diet.

The Cabbage Soup diet was wielded against unwanted pounds by flabby women in their 40’s in the 1970’s and 1980’s with great success. And now, for a limited time only, the Cabbage Soup Diet can now be utilized post-pandemic for all of your self-deprecating dietary needs.

It’s not tasty, it’s not great, but it sure beats fasting.

Ingredients

ingredient amount measurement
3 cups nonfat vegetable broth
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon tomato paste
2 cups chopped cabbage
1⁄2 whole yellow onion
1⁄2 cup chopped carrot
1⁄2 teaspoon basil
1⁄2 teaspoon oregano
to taste x salt & pepper

Here are things that she says you can add, but I never have this stuff, and I hate zuccini.

ingredient amount measurement
1⁄2 cup green beans
1⁄2 cup chopped zucchini

Instructions

I’m too lazy to write my own instructions, so here is someone else’s.

Just to recap, if you’re feeling like you need to drop a few pounds, or you’re feeling like the top one percent owns everything on God’s green earth including all of the edible food, you’ll be relieved to know that the Cabbage Soup Diet has also been used during the Great Depression by your Grandma and/or Great Grandma.

Relive the #GreatDepression, by eating #CabbageSoup. #Restrict your calories like the #ProAnna solopsistic asshole that you are with this easy-to-follow recipe[^8] for #CabbageSoup. Not to worry, this soup has so few calories, you won’t even have to throw it up afterwards.

Bon Appetit

Point of View

Brainstorming and freewriting about your character have proven to provide better writing if done before outlining. This exercise has been modified from the Gotham Writers’ Workshop.


Write from the POV of this character (either first, second, or third person), which means the character’s consciousness will inform the description.

Falling in love

A. 5 m

YOUR TURN: Think about a character who is going about the mundane job of cleaning his or her home. List different places they touch, how they will clean.

B. 5 m Let it linger

The character has just recently fallen in love, and you should let this emotion color the description without being directly stated.

YOUR TURN: Take a break and make yourself a cup of coffee, tea, or just do a little cleaning, letting your character linger in your mind while you do something mundane. Imagine how your character feels about the things they touch, and how that colors the description.

C. 20 m Freewrite

Keep in mind that there is no editing aloud in freewriting. It’s like doodling for the writer. No rereading, no spellcheck.

YOUR TURN: Freewrite a scene about this character going about this mundane task. Remember that there is no editing. Freewriting is like doodling for the writer. Don’t use your eraser, don’t worry if you’re writing the right thing… just write.

*Write from the POV of this character (either first, second, or third person), which means the character’s consciousness will inform the description.

Breakup

A. 5 m Brainstorm: List

YOUR TURN: Think about a character who is going about the mundane job of cleaning his or her home. List different places they touch, how they will clean.

B. 5 m Let it linger

The character has just recently gone through a breakup, and you should let this emotion color the description without being directly stated.

YOUR TURN: Take a break and make yourself a cup of coffee, tea, or just do a little cleaning, letting your character linger in your mind while you do something mundane. Imagine how your character feels about the things they touch, and how that colors the description now that they are no longer in love.

C. 20 m Freewrite

Keep in mind that there is no editing aloud in freewriting. It’s like doodling for the writer. No rereading, no spellcheck.

YOUR TURN: Rewrite the passage, knowing this character, the same character, has gone through a breakup. You’ll see how different the world looks depending on how people feel.

1. If you’re having trouble picking a name.2. If you’re really stuck… try these questions….

Dialogue Workshop

What interesting EVENTS happened this week? Do any of the events jump out at you? Do any of the events have a backstory? List the events, as many as you can, for 5 minutes, then choose one event to work with today.


List and Choose

Write down everything you remember that was said.

Dialogue

Now, write down what happened, but without people speaking.

Summary

Now that you have a collection of an event, dialogue, and events, collect them and put them in order.

What happened, step-by-step?

Imgur

Waffles

First… make your pancake mix.

  • 10 oz (or 2c) flour For the love that is all holy, please sift your flour.
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tbs sugar

Then follow this recipe…

But… um… keep in mind that I forgot the vanilla and I don’t know when to put it in or how much.

Recipe

Then turn them into delightful waffles!

I didn’t use vanilla and they were still amazing.
The waffle iron will tell you when they’re done.

The Republic by Plato

This book is in the public domain. A group of volunteers put it together and uploaded it to the kindle store for zero dollars.


If you like this kind of content, please, for the love of all that is holy, bookmark this page and submit free books when you find them. I’m collecting these for high school kids and teachers who cannot afford to purchase books for the classroom library. Use the form below to enter your findings so that I can easily use your entry as a “todo” in my list.

For the week of 3/8/2021


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday and Sunday

8K Weekend

Saturday, March 6, 2021
8 AM Central
8 PM Central

Sunday, March 7, 2021
8 AM Central
8 PM Central


Find more events by checking out these events lists:

Midcontinent Library Writing Events
New York City Library Writing Events


Haiku

Most people think of Haiku as a poem which has three lines with a limited number of syllables. And, if you knew that, give yourself a pat on the back! Asking yourself how many syllables is the first of three questions which define a Haiku.

  • How many syllables are in each line? (5,7,5)
  • What do I see in my mind’s eye as I read? (Imagery)
  • What part of nature do I feel more connected to, if any?

Old Pond is a Haiku written by the iconic Basho. It is the exemplification of everything that is Haiku. I will use it to answer the three questions one could ask of a Haiku.

How many syllables does each line have?

The number of syllables is a defining characteristic of a Haiku that most people remember.

(5) An old silent pond
(7) A frog jumps into the pond –
(5) Splash! Silence again.

And, this is, indeed, important because the limitation is a way to invite the mind to slow down and really spend time with each word. This slowing to creates space for the reader to consider each word and, as they come, each image.

What do I see in my mind’s eye?

An important question to ask is, “What do I see in my mind’s eye?” Fancy writers call this the image. Imagery in haiku is another defining characteristic. Remember that imagery is more than just what you see, it’s a combination of the other senses along with the sense of movement.

An old silent pond

I see green algae. I smell musty air. I feel it must be warm enough that I want to go walking. Usually I don’t visit old ponds as a journey if it’s cold. I hear silence. If it is silent, I picture the surface undisturbed. I’ve read this many times, and I find it odd that the words “silent pond” conjure the image still water for me. Maybe that’s because silence is a hard thing to “hear,” and my visual cortex takes over. But I imagine that the fish are sleeping and the water is dark.

A frog jumps into the pond

I remember that Frogs are smooth and green. They’re pretty small. I’m imagining a frog that I held when I was driving across the country. I stopped at a hotel instead of sleeping in my car. The hotel had a pool, and this frog had his tiny legs attached with atrociously long frog fingers to a white pole inside of the fence. I that frog, and the frog in my minds eye has a white belly.

I have a sense of movement. I picture his little legs trembling at the apex of his jump, spreading as wide as he can. I put myself inside of the frog and feel my chest rising and my arms spreading out. (I will note that I am not actually moving here, but my brain is responding as if I were.)

Splash! Silence again.

I hear how little that splash was, how fast it happened. I wonder how much bigger the splash was for him than it was for me, the observer. Then I start to wonder more…

Haiku is an invitation into the exploration of image and mood (the fancy word for how the poem makes a reader feel).

How do I feel connected to nature?

Connection to nature can come in many forms. Some examples would be that you feel yourself being connected as a steward of nature, as a part of nature, as an silent observer, but the connection is important.

The pilgrimage

The Haiku can be commentary on life and our place in it. It can critique us, praise us, and often remind us of our humanity, the fleeting nature of it. When that happens, remember that in any pilgrimage, the pilgrim returns home.

I feel connected to this piece in many ways, but the most important way to me was the break in silence that the frog made. Since the frog broke the silence, he matters. He rippled the water. I ripple the water.

There are many places to go on this pilgrimage. None of them are wrong, but none of them, in my opinion, is a place to stay. The “mysterium tremendum fascinans,”*1 is a frightening place to be, and, to be quite frank, Basho was not telling me that I matter, but that I am going to die. He was talking about the a frog and a moment in time. This is the part where I begin to return to the present moment and end my pilgrimage by asking myself a few more questions.

What do I hear now?

When I’m ready, in order to enter the world safely. I tap into the imagery of the present moment, my own poem, without words. I do this using a strategy called “5, 4, 3, 2, 1”.

Imgur

Congratulations, now you have all of the questions and tools that I have when reading and writing Haiku!

No real requirements

There are no real requirement to ask any of these questions in order to read or write a Haiku. As a matter of fact, if you think about it, Haiku was written in Japanese. Why would a defining characteristic of a Japanese poem be…

Three lines must be translated to have a specific number of syllables… in English… after being translated.

Yeah, no.

Haiku is “traditionally” (I use this term loosely) an exploration of limitation, imagery, and nature.

vivid

Count syllables, ask questions, take a mental pilgrimage, return home. Or don’t. Either way, Haikus are cool, and sometimes limitations help us discover more about ourselves.

Peace.

Footnotes

*1 Rudolf Otto was a religious scholar. Actually, to call him a scholar is understating his influence in the study of religion. He defined the religious experience as “mysterium tremendum fascinans”. Imgur

Works Cited


Tags: #haiku #poem #imagery